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Tambopata National Reserve

Tambopata National Reserve

The Tambopata National Reserve is located south of the Madre de Dios River in the districts of Inambari and Tambopata, which belong to the province of Tambopata, department of Madre de Dios. The reserve covers approximately 274,690 hectares.

Tambopata National Reserve

The presence of this natural reserve is very important because it preserves the fauna and flora and the ecological processes of a sample of the tropical rainforest. Also, this place generates conservation processes which ensure the sustainable use of natural resources and landscape. Machu Picchu tours, We offer tourist packages from 1 to 30 days, machu picchu full day, all inclusive.

The Tambopata river basin has one of the highest rates of biodiversity in the world. This reserve is located in the lower and middle zone of the basin. Among the most common ecosystems are the pacales, aguajales, swamps and riparian forests which allow the inhabitants of the area to take advantage of natural resources. Get to know Peru! We invite you to travel to Peru and discover the destinations, activities and plans in Peru that you don’t know yet.

The Tambopata National Reserve is home to mainly aquatic habitats which serve as stopovers for more than 40 species of transcontinental migratory birds. This place protects species considered in danger of extinction. It also offers tourists a privileged destination for the observation of wild biodiversity.

One of the recommended places to visit is La Collpa, a place inhabited by many species of animals that congregate to eat mineral salts from the soil. Some scholars believe that this behavior complements the diet of these animals. But there are also other hypotheses which say that the ingestion of soil reduces the toxic effects of some seeds and wild fruits that exist in that place. Machu Picchu travel forums. Find recommendations from travelers who have traveled to Machu Picchu and share your travel experiences with others.

These spectacular clay licks of the upper Tambopata River have made the Tambopata National Reserve well known because hundreds of individuals of various species of parrots and macaws gather here. There are also smaller macaw clay licks on the Heath River.

How was the Tambopata National Reserve created?

Beginning in 1990, several biologists and conservationists began lobbying to protect the Tambopata area from development. They were passionate about the preservation of this area, because it was (and is) one of the last remaining and largest areas of pristine rainforest. Specifically, Tambopata is one of the few areas that contains lowland and pre-mountain jungle, but also connects with cloud forests at higher elevations and humid savannas. Furthermore, very few people lived in the more remote areas of Tambopata. Conservationists realized that the region could act as an important corridor between Manu National Park and the jungles of Bolivia. The area was also home to healthy populations of tapirs, jaguars and other felines, giant otters, harpy eagles, many types of macaws and other animals that had disappeared from other parts of the Amazon.

Tambopata National Reserve has a remarkable diversity of plants and animals. Photo by Andrew Fedoruk

Initially, the area that includes today’s Tambopata National Reserve and nearby Bahuaja Sonene National Park was known as the “Tambopata-Candamo Reserved Zone” as an earlier form of protection. While the “reserved zone” status provided some protection to the area, it left the window open for changes in land use, so the area was still at risk. To help give the area a more permanent protected status, conservation organizations conducted further studies, which showed that protecting the region was vitally important for biodiversity and could work with local cultures. Those studies helped build a strong case for changing Tambopata’s status from “reserved zone” to “national reserve,” a more official and permanent protection, and the Tambopata National Reserve was born!

Here is an interactive Google map with the main lodges in the area, our lodges and how far/near they are from the national protected areas.

What else should I know about visiting Tambopata?

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